The Chance of Winning

AP Statistics create games, collect data for project

Grace Galdamez, Quill Co-Editor

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The AP Statistics Carnival took place on Oct. 8th during 5th and 8th period in the upstairs connecting hall and was filled with students bouncing from booth to booth, testing each game.

Students in the class were expected to create or modify a carnival game in which their peers could test, and they could collect statistics to determine their winning and losing rate. 

“I took the usual project guidelines from a Conference for Advancement of Mathematics Teaching and tweaked it and started the carnival last fall,” Ms. Overman, the AP statistics teacher said. “This year, I am improving the project by having students graph the percentage of wins after each play.”

The projects were created and worked on in a span of three weeks during and outside of class, but will not be completed for several weeks. Students were expected to gather materials and run several test trials to modify their projects until they felt satisfied in their game results. 

“I like the idea of students being able to gather a lot of data and carnival games are usually a lot of fun,” Overman said.

After weeks of preparation, Overman’s students took to the halls and opened their “Statistics Carnival” for open classrooms, and passerbyers in the hall. Winners were awarded Jolly Rancher candies, and allowed to test out as many booths as they wanted.  

 “We’re still using the project to look at some other ideas in our next unit, but I would already say that the project is a success,” Overman said. “ I hope to keep it every year because it’s such a fun way to see probability and statistics in action.”

Overall, the carnival was deemed a success from both players with handfuls of candy, and for the statistic students who got to collect data on their games. 

“This has been a long project but it’s been fun to do and see our results all come together,” Paola Gon (12) said.

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